• Employers hiring in February 2014

    We have over sixty thousand employers looking for new employees on TheLadders, and we could use your help.

    If you, or your friends or colleagues, could fit the bill for one of the below-listed jobs, please let us know by clicking through and applying. Even with the distraction of the Olympics, we expect February to be a month of strong demand for new employees, so these employers will appreciate your help!


    Greg Moody Greg Moody
    National Sales Manager at EBA Financial
    Outside Sales Representative – Arlington, VA
    Outside Sales Representative – Alexandria, VA
    Outside Sales Representative – Hampton, VA

    Martin Appelson Martin Appelson
    Partner at Bradford Group Consulting and Staffing
    Senior Business Data Governance Consultant – Edison, NJ
    Senior Data Modeling Consultant – Edison, NJ
    Senior Data Modeling Consultant – Stamford, CT

    Recruiting Team Recruiting Team
    Recruiting at Advocate Merchant Solutions, Inc.
    Senior Sales Executive – Helper, UT
    Senior Sales Executive – Helenville, WI
    Senior Sales Executive – Hellertown, PA

    Jim Porter Jim Porter
    Senior Recruiter at The Porter Group
    Sales Representative / 7550149 – Baltimore, MD
    Sales Representative / – 7751733 – Baltimore, MD
    Regional Sales Manager/-1071283 – Baltimore, MD

    Jeremy Gnozzo Jeremy Gnozzo
    President at Search Solution Group
    Director of Real Estate – Charlotte, NC
    Financial Reporting Analyst (BIG 4, CPA) – Charlotte, NC
    Project Engineer – Charlotte, NC

    Jack Kelly Jack Kelly
    Managing Director and Executive Recruiter at The Compliance Search Group, LLC
    Treasurer / Chief Compliance Officer Company – Fort Lee, NJ
    Senior Manager/ Director- Anti-Money Laundering – New York, NY
    Director Regulatory Relations – Jersey City, NJ

    Craig Kennedy Craig Kennedy
    Founder/President at Kennedy Unlimited Inc Professional Staffing
    Manager Safety Instrumented Systems – Houston, TX
    Project Manager Industrial Distribution – Houston, TX
    International Trade Manager – Houston, TX

    Raj Nichani Raj Nichani
    President at RMN Global Search
    Contract Attorney – Atlanta, GA
    Real Estate Finance Associate Attorney – Atlanta, GA
    IP Litigation Associate Attorney – Atlanta, GA

    Morgan Macdonell Morgan Macdonell
    Recruiter at iPRO Staffing
    Business Strategy & Intergration Manager – Phoenix, AZ
    Director of Emergency Department – Kingman, AZ
    Directory of Respiratory Therapy – Kingman, AZ

    Matt Pun Matt Pun
    Manager at VBENCH
    Developer – Chicago, IL
    Mobile App Developer – Chicago, IL
    Sr. Consultant – Hammond, IN

    Go for the gold!

  • It actually improves your resume a lot in about 2 minutes

    If you’re like most people, you have a resume that includes something like this:

    • Hired as Director, Tri-State Area
    • Responsible for a budget of $1.2 million
    • Managed staff of 5 in our downtown office

    Your details may be grander, or your career may be at an earlier stage, but lots and lots of people have this style of information presentation on their resume.

    Can you spot the error?

    These resume bullet points simply describe what you did. They don’t tell your future boss how good you are at doing the job.

    It’s obvious… If you’ve got a job, where you work in an office, in 2014, three things happened:
    – You were hired for that job
    – You had some monetary resources to manage
    – You had people working for or with you

    Seriously, you haven’t told the employer or your future boss anything they didn’t already know with those three bullet points.

    So here are two simple tips.

    First, read your resume out loud, putting the phrase "You should give me a bonus this year because…" in front of each line.

    If it doesn’t make sense that somebody would give you a bonus, or increase your bonus, because of that line… delete it.

    And write a different sentence that makes sense.

    For example, going into your boss’ office and telling her "You should give me a bonus this year because you hired me to be Director, Tri-State Area" wouldn’t get you very far. You don’t really deserve a year-end bonus just for getting hired. (Does not apply if you’re a Japanese star being signed to play for the Yankees).

    Rather, the things you do that deserve a bonus describe your accomplishments, not your position.

    You increased sales. You decreased expenses. You improved the time it takes to do the tasks. You increased the efficacy of the process or product.

    You made your company better somehow. You didn’t just show up… you did something well.

    Which brings us to the second tip.

    Count the number of $ signs and % signs on your resume. Now double them.

    That is, rewrite your resume and include twice as many $ and % as were on your original resume. (And the minimum you should have, if you’ve been in the workforce for over a decade, is twenty.)

    Dollar signs and percentage signs are indicators of achievements that you can quantify. Quantifiable achievements are more persuasive than qualitative achievements for most resumes.

    So rather than just increasing sales, decreasing expenses, or improving task times, you..

    • Increased sales by 27% in my region through the effective use of strategic selling.
    • Decreased costs by 11% in my division without impacting productivity.
    • Generated $11 million in new bookings through database marketing.
    • Reduced server load by 73%, and server cost by 22% through refactoring old code base.
    • Save $1.2 million in recruiting and legal costs by insourcing.
    • Improved factory throughput by 17% by re-engineering the supply chain and introducing new manufacturing techniques.

    When you read these bullet points with "You should give me a bonus this year because…", they all make sense. And that’s because they provide a quantifiable achievement that made the company better because you were there.

    And demonstrating to your future boss the types of achievements that he can expect from you, in numbers that he can understand, is the best way for him to come to the conclusion that you’re the right person for the job.

    And that’s how you make your resume so much more effective in about two minutes on a cold Monday morning in January. And that is quite an achievement!

    Have a 55% more fantastic week in the job search this week, Readers!

  • Please review the other applicants for this job first.

    Would you like to see the name, title, compensation, work history and educational background of each person applying to the same jobs you’re applying to here at TheLadders?

    Well, I can’t show you name, and sometimes I need to truncate the title in order preserve anonymity, but our popular feature "Scout" shows you the compensation, skills, title, work and educational background as well as overall years of experience for each applicant to the jobs posted directly here on TheLadders.

    For obvious reasons, we can’t show you personally identifiable information like current employer.

    But for understanding how realistic your prospects are in 2014, and how stiff the competition is, there’s no better insight on the web. (Or mobile).

    For example, here’s a closeup of the two parts of an applicant for a Director of Strategic Planning job:

    Vice President of Marketing

    This person’s current title is Vice President of Marketing, their compensation is around $160K, and they have over 15 years experience.

    How you compare

    The other half of the graphic shows you the salaries, years of experience, and education level of all the applicants to the job, and where "you" place. (When you log-in to your account the "you" arrows will accurately reflect the information you’ve given us, so you can compare easily.)

    Here’s an applicant for a VP Technology job, with a degree from Cal and over 15 years experience:

    VP of Technology

    Or a candidate for a Regional Vice President, Sales job:

    Regional Vice President of Sales

    Or a Director, Human Resources position:

    VP / Director of HR

    This information is helpful to you, because it allows you to understand the type of experience and background that others are bringing to their applications for the job, and the landscape of available options as the employer or recruiter may see it.

    From this, you’re better able to determine when you’d be a top prospect for a position, or, alternatively, when you’re kidding yourself about your suitability for a job. When every other applicant is much more experienced or a higher pay-grade than you, it’s best for you to save your clicks for another day.

    And that lets you spend your time more wisely.

    It also looks great on the iPhone and Android, so you can make the most of your airport downtime:

    TheLadders on mobile devices

    Make sure you get all the advantages you need to get to the finish line in the job search by using "Scout" in this (remarkably cold so far) New Year!

  • These companies are hiring, can you help?

    We’re starting 2014 with more employers on TheLadders system than ever before. Compared to a year ago, we’re seeing:

    Twice as many registered employers

    Almost three times as many logins as a year ago,

    With three times as many searches, and

    50% more job postings posted with us.

    All of that means that we’ve got lots of employers with a need to fill their 2014 jobs right now. Today. Pronto.

    And I mean quick.

    So take a look through this partial list of top employers on TheLadders and click through to see employment opportunities on TheLadders:

    Facebook

    eBay

    Kellogg Company

    Chrysler

    Bloomberg

    Gallup

    Intel

    Baxter

    Salesforce

    The Home Depot

    Amazon

    Quintiles

    Novo Nordisk

    Ingram Micro

    ADP

    Department Of Veterans Affairs

    Infosys

    AppNexus

    TriNet

    Allstate

    Time Warner Cable

    AOL

    Accenture

    Aurionpro

    Uline

    Traeger Grills

    Kinetix

    Dun & Bradstreet

    RJ Reynolds

    Ricoh

    Ideal Image

    Kore Systems LLC

    Metlife

    NewTown Solutions

    U.S. Cellular

    Advocate Merchant Solutions

    Ohio National Financial Services

    KPMG

    RGP

    Verizon

    Echo Daily

    Financial Services Company

    Cvent

    Life Technologies

    Dignity Health

    T-Mobile

    Visiting Nurse Service of New York

    PayPal

    Microsoft

    PwC

    Verengo Solar

    Pacific Dental Services

    Heartland Payment Systems

    Avanade

    Aetna

    Cognizant System

    WellDyne

    ACI Adjustment Group

    LivingSocial

    CSC

    Blue 15 Marketing

    NTT DATA, Inc.

    Capital One

    Gentiva

    Ampcus Inc

    Celgene Corporation

    Cintas

    TIAA-CREF

    Dex Media

    Office Depot

    UPS

    Gentiva Health Services, Inc.

    Futrend Technology, Inc

    Pitney Bowes

    EMD

    Worldpay

    NCR

    Valassis

    Aon Hewitt

    Arrow Electronics

    Quest Diagnostics

    Crowe Horwath

    OfficeMax

    Citi

    Insperity

    AdvancePierre Foods

    Unisys

    Pat Licata

    USAA

    Comcast

    Business Services Company

    McGraw Hill Financial

    Coventry Health Care

    AVAYA

    MMC

    Level 3 Communications

    AlliedBarton

    Travelers

    TDG Brokerage

    Frontier Communications

    FosterThomas

    BAE Systems

    The Leverage Group

    AT&T

    Fresenius Medical Care

    Have a great week in the search, Readers!

    I’m rooting for you.

  • Hired!

    Thousands of your fellow subscribers have found their new jobs this past year on TheLadders!

    Employers using TheLadders to hire grew 50% in the past year, and hiring activities on our site doubled.

    Why? Because TheLadders professionals are interested in a new job, and behave respectfully. While the typical job posting on LinkedIn or Monster gets hundreds (thousands!) of unqualified applications, the typical job at TheLadders gets just 21 applicants that are targeted, relevant, and interesting to the HR person or recruiter.

    So while we don’t have the space to share them all, here are a hundred of the top positions landed by your fellow subscribers through TheLadders.com in the past months:

    Title Salary Location
    Vice President $150K New York
    VP of Software Development $160K Parsippany, NJ
    Vice President Operations $145K Tulsa, OK
    Vice President of Brand Strategy $140K Columbus, OH
    VP of Sales $100K New York, NY
    Vice President, Engineering $120K Peoria, IL
    VP of Marketing $175K Charlotte, NC
    Senior VP $150K New York, NY
    VP of Operations $125K Houston, TX
    VP Creative Development $100K Tampa, FL
    Vice President $200K Melville, NY
    VP of Marketing $140K Goshen, Indiana
    Director $145K Raleigh, NC
    Plant Manager $135K Louisville, KY
    Director of Finance $105K Los Angeles, CA
    Project Manager $110K Houston, TX
    Sales Manager $107K Muskegon, MI
    Strategic Account Manager $88K Milwaukee, WI
    Division Sales Specialist $125K Virtual / Travel
    Senior Director $110K New York, NY
    Account Director $150K New York, NY
    Client relationship Manager $80K Chicago, IL
    Executive Director $125K Alamogordo, NM
    Citrix Business Systems Architect $166K New York, NY
    Chief Financial Officer $130K Coppell, TX
    President $200K Pittsburgh, PA
    Director of Sales $110K Colorado
    General Manager $175K New Jersey
    Marketing Manager $95K San Diego, CA
    Maintenance Manager $100K Havre de Grace, MD
    District Manager $90K Nashville, TN
    Assistant Controller $100K Long Island
    Director, Global Learning & Development $145K Dallas, TX
    IT Program Manager $170K Troy, MI
    Sr. Buyer $100K Houston, TX
    International Sales Manager $95K Wisconsin
    Senior Financial Analyst $95K Miami, FL
    HR Partner $107K New York, NY
    Task Lead $95K Arlington, VA
    Systems Engineer $85K New York, NY
    Program Manager $115K San Diego, CA
    Sr. Tax Manager $100K Charlotte, NC
    Software Manager $90K Champaign, IL
    Tech Research $150K New York
    Director, Supply Chain $150K St Louis, MO
    Senior Tibco Developer $110K New York, NY
    Sales $90K Alpharetta, GA
    Infrastructure Integration Engineer $145K New York, NY
    Director, Marketing $145K Chicago IL
    Director of Territory Sales $110K Virtual
    Call Center Manager $120K Nashville, TN
    Manager, Global Accounts $108K Los Angeles, CA
    Director of Internal Audit $220K Atlanta, GA
    Western Region Sales $110K San Jose, CA
    District Sales Manager $85K Milford CT
    Branch Manager $100K Temple Terrace, FL
    Director of Financial Accounting Operations $170K Ashburn, VA
    Direct Response Sales Executive $100K New England
    Hospital Manager $110K Concord, CA
    Senior Account Manager $110K Virtual / Travel
    Project Lead $113K Reston, VA
    Sr. Director, Marketing $145K Los Angeles, CA
    Project Manager $80K Dallas, TX
    Director of Engineering Services $145K Flat Rock, MI
    Director, Market Research $142K Seattle, WA
    Account Executive $100K Boise, ID
    Channel Program Manager $120K Chicago
    General Manager $180K El Paso, TX
    Cloud Healthcare Manager $150K Atlanta, GA
    Senior Principal $140K Boston, MA
    Branch Manager $90K Harrisburg, PA
    Director of Marketing $135K New York, NY
    Client Partner $132K Cincinnati, OH
    Client Manager $85K Orlando, FL
    Sr. Account Executive $125K Midwest
    Account Executive $200K Boston, MA
    Controller $131K Naperville, IL
    Account Executive $100K Florida
    Director of Sales $105K Iowa
    HR Director $123K San Francisco, CA
    Sr. IT Project Manager $140K Sunnyvale, CA
    Sales, Marketing & Public Relations Manager $120K Annapolis, MD
    Business Development Manager $120K Austin, TX
    COO $110K The Dalles, OR
    Director Testing and Quality $160K Sunnyvale, CA
    Account Executive $90K Philadelphia, PA
    Director of HR $130K New Jersey
    Supply chain Manager $110K Long Branch, NJ
    CRM Strategist $150K Lakeland FL
    General Manager $125K Yonkers, NY
    SAP GRC Systems Controls $130K New York, NY
    Account Executive $100K East Meadow, NY
    Chief Research Officer $185K Virtual / Travel
    Agent $85K Orange, CA
    Site Manager $115K Bethlehem, PA
    Senior Software Sales $90K Dallas, TX
    Director, Pacific Operations $150K South Korea
    Contracts Administrator $85K Redwood City, CA
    Consultant $115K New York, NY
    Director of Learning $115K Sacramento, CA

    Good luck in your search this week!

    I’ll be rooting for you.

  • Your promotion and pay raise this year

    These are the last days of the year, and a good time to make your New Year better-paying.

    Let me know about your promotion at work this year, or your pay raise / new target compensation, and we’ll make sure that the jobs we send you in 2014 match your ambitions.

    It’s awfully easy to update your career history with us:



    Just add your company name, title, and work dates, and that gives us a lot of information that we can use to tailor our results to you.

    So make the most of this last Monday of the year, update your title with us today, and you’ll get a lot better jobs for all of your tomorrows.

    I’ll be rooting for you.

  • What the most successful people do before breakfast in 2014

    My friend, Laura Vanderkam, had a smash hit this year with her book, “What The Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast“, and I thought this quiet holiday week a good time to share her secrets of those savvy folks who make the most of the darkness before dawn.

    Her best bit of advice? To make the most out of 2014, start at the end, and answer “what would you like to say you did this year?” Specifically, her advice is:

    Write the professional review you’d like to give yourself at the end of 2014.

    What three big professional goals would you like to say you accomplished? Think through the coming year and put down on paper the achievements you’d like to push yourself to complete. What steps will you have taken to get there? What obstacles will you have overcome? What small triumphs and milestone rewards will you celebrate along the way?

    Visualize your success, and the (always unexpectedly changing) path there, and you’ll be a long step towards professional happiness twelve months hence.

    Laura adds, that you can do this in your personal life, too.

    You’ve no doubt been getting holiday letters and cards from family and friends with their pictures of vacations taken, babies had, and memories created. So…

    Why not write your holiday card or letter now? In December 2013?

    What would you like to say you’ve done in your personal life by the end of next year? Knowing that you want to say this is the year you joined a choir, visited Dublin, or started volunteering with the Boys & Girls Club vastly increases the chances that those things actually happen.

    A little forward thinking remakes the future to your liking.

    To get Laura’s tips, insights, and advice on improving your odds of making those future projections a reality, pick up her eBook at Amazon: “What The Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast“, and give yourself an unfair advantage in the New Year.

    I’ll be rooting for you.

  • You need to send these emails right now. Everyone will thank you.

    My friend, Eric Barker, has been writing for years on how to make yourself, your life, and your career better, over at his blog Barking Up The Wrong Tree.

    A recent post — “Make Your Life Better By Sending Five Simple Emails” — will indeed make your life better.

    I won’t go through all five, but the first two seem especially appropriate for end-of-year good feelings and New Year’s oaths to reformation:

    “Every morning send a friend, family member or co-worker an email to say thanks for something.”

    (The surprising thing is that you’ll get even more out of it than your recipients will.)

    And…

    “At the end of the week, send your boss an email and sum up what you’ve accomplished.”

    (Waaaay easier than trying to remember all your heroics at review or resume-writing time. Keep it to 5 or fewer bullets, though. OK?)

    You can check out the rest of the email suggestions over at his blog here.

    But to get the benefit of all of Eric’s great insights throughout the year, sign up for his e-mail updates here.

    Hope you’re enjoying the Season, Readers…

    I’m rooting for you.

  • So if not me, who did get the job?

    When two candidates are equally experienced, equally credentialed, and equally capable, who gets the job?

    Well, when two companies have similar products, with similar ratings, and similar prices, which do you pick?

    If you think about it, you might say: “the one that wants my business more.” The saleswoman made an extra effort, or the people at the store went out of their way to be kind, or it’s as simple as they just smiled back and said “we’d like your business.”

    It’s no surprise: we prefer to buy from companies that make us feel like we’re a welcome part of their community.

    And who gets the job if the applicants are equals?

    The candidate with a passion for the business. A zeal for the industry. An excitement, an enthusiasm, a zest for the art, and the craft, and the science, of what makes a company in the field succeed.

    In today’s economy – a sophisticated economy increasingly based on design, thinking work, proprietary creativity, and the ability to grasp and apply complex intellectual abstractions – the need is greater than ever for those who can… think.

    And thinking work is different from the typical jobs of even a generation or two past. A steel mill manager, a radio set salesman, or a train operator could measure their success in physical quantities: how much steel poured, sets sold, or tons shipped.

    In an information economy, on the other hand, the measures of success are increasingly intangible. The iPod was better than other MP3 players not because it had more, but because it had fewer buttons and features – the right buttons and features for music on the go. A restaurant chain displaces a competitor because it feels more (or less) like home. A shoe company thrives because it gives away half the pairs that you buy. Even vacuum cleaners, cars, and backyard grills are made, marketed and sold in ways that were inconceivable in the last century.

    Producing these products and services, consequently, is less a function of the volume of resources that are put in. In generations past, more raw materials, capital equipment, or men punching your time clock meant more finished products or services coming out the other side. Today, it’s often more important how little you put in, or how artfully you arrange the features.

    Finding people who can make those decisions well, and then execute on those decisions, is difficult for bosses.

    They have to figure out who is going to understand the customer better, the manufacturing process better, the marketing better, the interface better, and so on.

    What’s more, bosses need to determine who’s going to stick with it – there are a lot more forks in the road, and bumps along the way, in this intangible world. Perseverance through the inevitable fumbles and fiascos is needed because without perseverance there are no victories.

    And what bosses have discovered is that somebody who is passionate about the business tends to be a better employee and a better professional to work with.

    Because somebody who is passionate is inherently motivated, and internally driven to succeed, they try harder to find answers. They think up clever stuff on their own. They enjoy the business, and the customers, and the industry so much that they’re always discovering new things or perceiving additional ways that the business could succeed.

    In short, passionate people are better employees because they care more than dispassionate people. Passionate people care more than the average employee, they care more than the average applicant, and they care more than you.

    And that’s why you didn’t get the job. It’s why you got passed over, turned down, or put in the “nice to have” pile.

    If you truly want success in this business climate, you need to do what you’re actually passionate about. Otherwise, you’re just unfairly stacking the deck in some other applicant’s favor.

    I’m rooting for you.

  • Please review the other applicants for this job first.

    Would you like to see the name, title, compensation, work history and educational background of each person applying to the same jobs you’re applying to here at TheLadders?

    Well, I can’t show you name, and sometimes I need to truncate the title in order preserve anonymity, but our popular feature “Scout” shows you the compensation, skills, title, work and educational background as well as overall years of experience for each applicant to the jobs posted directly here on TheLadders.

    For obvious reasons, we can’t show you personally identifiable information like current employer.

    But for understanding how realistic your prospects are, and how stiff the competition is, there’s no better insight on the web.

    For example, here’s a closeup of the two parts of an applicant for a Director of Strategic Planning job:




    This person’s current title is Vice President of Marketing, their compensation is around $160K, and they have over 15 years experience.



    The other half of the graphic shows you the salaries, years of experience, and education level of all the applicants to the job, and where “you” place. (When you log-in to your account the “you” arrows will accurately reflect the information you’ve given us, so you can compare easily.)

    Here’s an applicant for a VP Technology job, with a degree from Cal and over 15 years experience:



    Or a candidate for a Regional Vice President, Sales job:



    Or a Director, Human Resources position:



    This information is helpful to you, because it allows you to understand the type of experience and background that others are bringing to their applications for the job, and the landscape of available options as the employer or recruiter may see it.

    From this, you’re better able to determine when you’d be a top prospect for a position, or, alternatively, when you’re kidding yourself about your suitability for a job. When every other applicant is much more experienced or a higher pay-grade than you, it’s best for you to save your clicks for another day.

    And that lets you spend your time more wisely.

    It also looks great on mobile, so you can make the most of your airport downtime:



    “Scout” has been one of our most popular and successful features this year, so December is a good time for you to familiarize yourself with it, as you get ready for the New Year.

    Have a great week in the search, Readers.

    I’m rooting for you!