• Will your employer die before you do?

    Good Monday morning!

    The news of Dell’s “going private” conversations led my friend and frequent BloombergTV commentator Paul Kedrosky to tweet:

    Now Paul’s a great one for deep tweets, and his wondering if PC technology has grown old before its time, got me to thinking about the speed with which businesses grow, mature and decline in the 21st century.

    Of course, companies are born, companies live and thrive, and companies die, all the time. That’s capitalism.

    And your job, when it comes to thinking about your career, is to join the best company you can, in the most thriving industry that interests you, so as to keep your opportunities open and your prospects bright.

    Nobody wants to be the last man in the 8-track-tape business.

    Keeping ahead of this “creative destruction” of aging businesses is a bigger and more salient part of the modern professional’s toolkit.

    It wasn’t always this way, of course. Lifetime employment and the gold watch at retirement were common until twenty years ago.

    But times have changed. In the modern era, companies, and entire industries, die more quickly, leaving us to adjust our career plans accordingly.

    The important things for you to remember are:

    Your company’s fate is not in your hands.

    A wrong bet, a foolish strategy, an ill-timed disaster, a devastating competitor, an ill-conceived loan, or just plain old bad luck, could cause you to arrive at the office tomorrow to find… there’s no office.

    Even if you love your job, your boss, and your company, it could suddenly blow up one day. It’s happened to Arthur Anderson, Lehman Brothers, Hostess Brands, and hundreds more.

    For your financial and career security, it is very important that you always be prepared for the demise of your current position. You need to take calls from recruiters, stay in touch with friends from the industry, keep up on recent developments in the sector, and keep your eyes open to the positions available here on TheLadders (and the left-hand side of this e-mail).

    Because, really, you never know.

    Your skills are losing value.

    The stuff you studied in college, the training you got at the beginning of your career, the rules of thumb you’ve internalized over the years: all of them are losing value even while you read this sentence.

    That’s always been the case, but the increasing speed of modern business life means that they are losing value more quickly than they ever have in the past. We’re probably the first generation since the 1840′s where everything your parents’ generation knew about the tactical running of a business is already obsolete.

    Every year, you’ve got to add something new to your toolkit. You might not be able to reinvent yourself in the space of six months, but just imagine how current you’ll be, and how attractive you’ll appear, when you tell your next interviewer the five skills, certificates, technologies, or methods you’ve picked up over the previous half-dozen years.

    Keeping yourself up-to-date is part of your job.

    Your industry is dying.

    When even the celebrated technology companies of our youth — Microsoft, Dell, Intel — find themselves with flat-lining, or worse, stock prices for over a decade, it’s clear that the bloom comes off the rose much more quickly in the modern era.

    The invention of new technologies, and the development of new products from them, result in even the most innovative industries finding themselves sidelined far faster than in the past.

    In some cases, it seems that industries are living shorter lives than human beings.

    And the implications of that — that not only is the company you join out of college unlikely to make it to your retirement party, but that the entire industry you first join will pass away before you do — are quite profound for your career.

    Being too closely dependent on any particular industry is putting yourself and your future earnings at risk. The pall that has settled on print journalism, client-server architecture, pharmaceutical sales, automotive, keyboarded wireless devices, or the big box retailing industries may eventually loom over currently-hot niches such as fracking, mobile, outsourcing, e-commerce, greentech, and social marketing.

    Keep your curiosity open and your mind engaged with new trends, and new industries — they may be your employers one day sooner than you think.

    Your fate is in your hands.

    Your company, and certainly, your industry, have very few of your long-term interests at heart. Even the most benevolent of employers are subject to the whims of their customers, regulators, financiers, and owners, to say nothing of the competition. At the end of that long line is you, the employee, and you’d better be pretty wise as to what that means for your future horizons.

    It means you have to take your own career development seriously, and make it your primary professional duty throughout your working life.

    It means constantly adding new skills to replace the dying ones: learn SEO, public speaking, NoSQL databases, social recruiting, privacy law, the parts of Salesforce.com that you usually ignore, or a new tactical skill in your field.

    It means staying aware of which way the wind is blowing, whether or not you need a weatherman to tell you.

    And it means realizing that even the best of intentions from the best of employers on their best days, does little for you when happenstance separates you from your position of employment.

    Keep in mind that these fragile, fleeting companies that you call home may be “called home” by the Great Auditor in the Sky someday sooner than you think.

    And plan accordingly.

  • The best employers and recruiters in the country for you


    Good Monday morning!

    Each quarter, our CEO Alex Douzet publishes our list of the best employers and recruiters in the country. These represent the savviest, most supportive and most successful hiring professionals in the USA, and we are pleased to have them be part of the extended TheLadders family.

    With great pleasure, acclaim, and gratitude, may I present this selection from our most recent “Top Recruitment Professionals in America” list, for Winter 2013:

    Top Corporate Recruitment Professionals:


    Tom Heathco
    Tom Heathco
    Allstate
    Become an Allstate Exclusive Agent
    , Lakeland, FL



    Nathan Washington
    Nathan Washington
    Benefit Professor Corp
    Sr. Account Executive
    , Miami, FL
    Sr. Account Executive
    , Atlanta, GA
    Sr. Account Executive
    , Birmingham, AL


    Melissa Burke
    Melissa Burke
    Northwestern Mutual
    Financial Representative
    , Philadelphia, PA
    Independent Business Owner
    , Philadelphia, PA


    Yuri Rutman
    Yuri Rutman
    NOCI
    Private Equity, Hedge Fund, Venture Capital Partner
    , Santa Monica, CA
    Alternative & Venture Investment,private Equity Partner
    , Los Angeles, CA


    Jeff Moore
    Jeff Moore
    Allstate
    Allstate Exclusive Agent
    , Orlando, FL


    Jordan Kachmarik
    Jordan Kachmarik
    DHL Express
    Outside Sales Executive – Entry to Mid Level
    , Norwalk, CT


    Dan DeLuca
    Dan DeLuca
    Aetna
    Senior Application Architect
    , Minneapolis, MN
    Implementation Program Director
    , New York City, NY


    Lisa Doorly
    Lisa Doorly
    Danaher
    Supply Chain Leader
    , Springfield, VA
    Director, Global Materials and Sourcing
    , Altoona, PA
    Technical Sales Specialist
    , Boxborough, MA


    Peter Castillo
    Peter Castillo
    McGraw-Hill Companies
    Director, K-5 Product Marketing (26342)
    , Columbus, OH
    Email Marketing Analyst (26329)
    , New York, NY
    Sales Representative
    , Ann Arbor, MI


    Vignesh Vigs
    Vignesh Vigs
    AurionPro
    Pre-sales Consultant
    , New York, NY
    Hiring Oracle DBA
    , Canada
    .Net Developer
    , Marlborough, MA


    Michelle Culley
    Michelle Culley
    Echo Daily
    Account Executive
    , Tucson, AZ
    Account Executive
    , Honolulu, HI
    Account Executive
    , Helena, MT


    Matt Ramsey
    Matt Ramsey
    New York Life
    Financial Services Professional
    , Fort Worth, TX
    Insurance and Investment Sales/Career Sales Manager
    , Fort Worth, TX


    Joe Sabrin
    Joe Sabrin
    DTG Consulting Solutions
    Account Executive – Sales
    , Port Washington, NY
    Director of Computer Services Merchandising
    , Miami, FL
    Inside Sales Account Manager
    , Raleigh, NC


    Barb Heidenreich
    Barb Heidenreich
    ADP
    National Accounts B2B Human Capital Mgmt Sales
    , New York City, NY
    National Accounts B2B Sales – Human Capital Managment
    , Moldova;Baltimore, MD;Minneapolis,
    National Accounts District Sales Manager
    , Moldova;Baltimore, MD;Columbia, MD


    Cortney Lopez
    Cortney Lopez
    Echo Daily
    Account Executive
    , West Bloomfield, MI
    Account Executive
    , Austin, TX
    Account Executive
    , Springfield, IL


    Sylvia Hilmy
    Sylvia Hilmy
    HP
    Sales Account Executive – eDiscovery Sales
    , Portland, OR
    Client Director, Optimost
    , New York, NY
    Sales Account Executives – General US
    , Boston, MA


    Matt Thomas
    Matt Thomas
    The Right Thing
    Trauma Sales Associate II – Top Medical Device Company
    , Oklahoma City, OK


    Ed Nathanson
    Ed Nathanson
    Rapid7
    Principal Data Architect
    , Cambridge, MA
    Principal Data Architect
    , Los Angeles, CA
    Principal Data Architect
    , Austin, TX


    Shelley Wick
    Shelley Wick
    Generac
    Territory Development Manager – California
    , Sacramento, CA
    Director of Sales
    , Waukesha, WI
    Channel Marketing Manager
    , Waukesha, WI


    Ximena Rosas
    Ximena Rosas
    State Farm
    State Farm Agent: Sales – Insurance – Management
    , Irvine, CA
    BUSINESS OWNER Opportunity, Insurance – Finance
    , Los Angeles, CA
    BUSINESS OWNER Opportunity, Insurance – Finance
    , Riverside, CA

    Top Executive Recruiters:


    Nicholas McClain
    Nicholas McClain
    MRS/McKnight Recruiting
    Insurance Sales Executive / Agency Management
    , CO
    Assistant District Manager
    , Concord, CA
    Insurance Sales Agent / Agency Manager
    , MONTROSE, CO


    Molly O'Brien
    Molly O’Brien
    Pinstripe Talent
    Financial Advisor Program – Garden City, NY
    , Garden City, NY
    Financial Advisor Program – Melville, NY
    , Melville, NY
    Financial Advisor Program – New York, NY
    , New York, NY


    Ashley McKelvey
    Ashley McKelvey
    Global Energy Recruiters
    Manager, Business Intelligence
    , Houston, TX
    Supply Chain Functional Consultant
    , San Francisco, CA
    Sr. Finance Functional Consultant
    , New York, NY


    Joe Szlosek
    Joe Szlosek
    J&S Recruitment
    Senior Internal Auditor – Growing Bank
    , Binghamton, NY
    Senior Internal Auditor – Growing Bank
    , Boston, MA
    Internal Audit Manager
    , Buffalo, NY


    Dhananjay Chouhan
    Dhananjay Chouhan
    Collabera
    Mobile Web Developer :: Bloominton IL
    , Bloomington, IL
    AIX / Unix System Administrator :: Work from Home
    , Jersey City, NJ
    Java Python Developer
    , Charlotte, NC


    Morgan MacDonell
    Morgan MacDonell
    iPRO Staffing
    Transactional Pricing Team Manager
    , Houston, TX
    Histology Section Specialist/Supervisor
    , Wyoming, MI
    Hematologist / Oncologist
    , Fort Lauderdale, FL


    Andrew Shively
    Andrew Shively
    The Rainmaker Recruiting Group
    Inside Sales Manager
    , Posen, IL
    Regional Sales Manager
    , Los Angeles, CA
    Regional Sales Manager
    , Cincinnati, OH


    Scott Leishman
    Scott Leishman
    AOK Staffing
    Director – Mobility Applications Architect
    , Minneapolis, MN
    Director – Mobility Applications Architect
    , Lexington, KY
    Healthcare Sr. Clinical Account Director
    , New York, NY


    Ulmer Miller
    Ulmer Miller
    USA Recruiting Experts
    Case Manager – RN – PA #1591
    , King Of Prussia, PA
    Furnace Operator–OK #1600
    , Tulsa, OK
    Field Service Technician-Capital Equip–WA #1599
    , Seattle, WA


    Joseph Vaccariello
    Joseph Vaccariello
    Genesis
    Senior Formulation Scientist*coating formulation EXP
    , MN
    Senior Formulation Scientist*coating formulation EXP
    , MN
    MTS – Cell Characterization Engineer
    , CA


    John Myers
    John Myers
    StepBeyond
    Business Development Manager
    , Tampa, FL
    Engineering Test Tech
    , Harrodsburg, KY
    Director of Manufacturing
    , Fremont, CA


    Darren Frank
    Darren Frank
    Recruitment Trends, Inc.
    Director, Online Marketing: Retail/ Ecommerce
    , New York, NY
    Integrated Marketing Communications Program Manager
    , New York, NY
    Ecommerce Merchandise Planner
    , New York, NY


    Steve Swan
    Steve Swan
    Stephen Swan & Associates
    Vice President, Business Development – Market Research
    , DC
    Sales Director – Market Research
    , Los Angeles, CA
    Sales Director – Market Research
    , CHICAGO, IL


    Brian Gill
    Brian Gill
    Intelligent Staffing
    Senior Java Developer
    , Dayton, OH
    Software Configuration Management ( CM ) Analyst
    , DC


    Rusty Almon
    Rusty Almon
    Almon Group
    Environmental Services Account Executive
    , San Diego, CA
    Environmental Testing Services Account Executive
    , San Francisco, CA
    Sales Training Manager
    , San Diego, CA


    Linda Murphy-Mulder
    Linda Murphy-Mulder
    Burrell & Associates, Inc.
    Wire Line and/or Wireless Sales Executive
    , San Antonio, TX
    Small Business Sales Manager – Telecom & Wireless
    , Portland, OR
    Senior Business Sales Executive – Telecom
    , Saint Louis, MO


    Debbie Hoskins
    Debbie Hoskins
    Calibre Solutions
    JD Edwards Consultant
    , Chicago, IL
    Senior Business Analyst
    , Oakland, CA
    Senior Business AnalystsaSenior Business Analyst
    , LANSING, MI


    Steve Kohn
    Steve Kohn
    Affinity Executive Search
    Dir of Marketing- Medical Imaging Products ? MO 663330
    , Saint Louis, MO
    Account Executive – ECM/WCM/Portal Space – NY/NJ 533440
    , NJ
    Sales Advisor – Wealth Mgt Services- Virtual 649319
    , Virtual / Travel


    Jack Kelly
    Jack Kelly
    Compliance Search Group
    Control Room VP Investment Banking
    , New York, NY
    Anti – Money Laundering Banking Compliance Officer
    , New York, NY
    Employee Trading Compliance
    , New York, NY


    Pad Swami
    Pad Swami
    UrpanTech
    Performance Test Engineer
    , Tampa, FL
    Performance Engineering Consultant
    , Atlanta, GA
    Manager – Talent & Organizational Performance
    , Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Congratulations to them all! For the full list of 200 Corporate Recruitment Professionals and 200 Executive Recruiters, click here.

    I’m rooting for you,

    Marc Cenedella

    Marc Cenedella, Founder

    You can follow me on Twitter here: @cenedella

  • Please review the other applicants for this job first.

    Good Monday morning,

    Would you like to see the name, title, compensation, work history and educational background of each person applying to the same jobs you’re applying to here at TheLadders?

    Well, I can’t show you name, and sometimes I need to truncate the title in order to preserve anonymity, but our new feature “Scout” shows you the compensation, skills, title, work and educational background as well as overall years of experience for each applicant to the jobs posted directly here on TheLadders.

    For obvious reasons, we can’t show you personally identifiable information like current employer.

    But for understanding how realistic your prospects are, and how stiff the competition is, there’s no better insight on the web.

    For example, here’s an applicant for a Director of Operations job:



    This person’s current title is Operations CI Manager, their compensation is in the $120K to $140K range, and they have over 15 years experience. (When you log-in to your account the “you” arrows will accurately reflect the information you’ve given us, so you can compare easily.)

    Here’s an applicant for a VP – Marketing Leader job, with a degree from Kellogg and over 15 years experience:



    Or a candidate for Director of Information Technology:



    Or a Human Resources Manager position:



    This information is helpful to you, because it allows you to understand the type of experience and background that others are bringing to their applications for the job, and the landscape of available options as the employer or recruiter may see it.

    From this, you’re better able to determine when you’d be a top prospect for a position, or, alternatively, when you’re kidding yourself about your suitability for a job. When every other applicant is much more experienced or a higher pay-grade than you, it’s best for you to save your clicks for another day.

    And that let’s you spend your time more wisely.

    It also looks great on mobile, so you can make the most of your airport downtime:

    Here’s “Scout” on your smartphone…



    …and on your tablet!


    “Scout” is rolling out across the TheLadders.com website throughout Q1, keep your eyes peeled for it!

    I’m rooting for you,

    Marc Cenedella

    Marc Cenedella, Founder

  • Amanda takes over Grand Central with 3,000 friends – check out the pics from New York City

    Good Monday morning,

    We took over Grand Central Station here in Manhattan a week ago Thursday to bring you “JobCentral” – a day of interviews with employers, tips and advice on the job search, a free membership gift for attendees, and, of course, our own “Ask Amanda”!

    Thanks for coming out and making it a great day! For all 5½ million of you across the country who might not have made it to New York, you can get Amanda’s recap and free access to all of the materials here.


    Amanda Augustine led the way on a day of great advice for people looking to get ahead.

    Allison Hagendorf, fresh from dropping the ball with the Mayor in Times Square on New Year’s Eve, hosted the day for us. Here she’s giving away one of our prizes on the day.

    We had real, actual interviews going on….


    …with top employers like Hearst….

    …and speakers from HP…..

    …and more interviews….

    …and even more interviews…

    …and coffee…


    …and great advice…


    …and more interviews!


    Our whole team loved helping out.


    Our head of Product, Selena Hadzibabic, introduces our new feature “Scout” — I’ll be telling you more about it next week!


    The whole product team loved hearing your reactions, and surprise, and feedback, about Scout!


    Amanda and JobCentral host Allison Hagendorf.


    Amanda interviewed by Pix 11.


    Speaker Pamela Johnston answers the question “Who are you anyway?”


    Handing out info and demos.


    “Behind the scenes” — Amanda talked pretty much non-stop for 6 hours. On her feet. In heels. Give the woman a hand.


    For us, the chance to show you our new products and hear from you directly were the biggest upside of the day.


    Before the crowds arrive, Amanda checks how her fantasy football teams are doing. Just kidding, she’s checking her notes and posting on her Twitter account @JobSearchAmanda.


    Our CEO, Alex Douzet, says thank you for making it a great day.

    We hope you got a lot of positive information and energy out of the day of taking over Grand Central, Readers, and we’ll keep bringing you more ways to be successful in your job hunt throughout the year!

    I’m rooting for you,

    Marc Cenedella

    Marc Cenedella, Founder

  • Should employers be looking at this resume, or a different one?

    Good Monday morning!

    Did you recently update your resume with us? If the resume you gave us here is the right one for us to share, then do nothing. When one of the 30,000 employers or recruiters registered with TheLadders sees you on our system, that’s what they’ll find.

    To get your updated resume into the system, visit this link and update, or you can:

    Click here.

    Because with more recruiters, more HR people, and more hiring managers flocking to TheLadders than ever before in our ten years in business, we’d like to help you make the most out of 2013, and get your new, updated, resume into the right hands.

    I’m rooting for you,

    Marc Cenedella

    Marc Cenedella, Founder

  • These employers need to hire now for 2013

    Happy first Monday of the year!

    We’ve got 28,204 employers, HR managers and recruiters looking to hire professionals
    for 2013, Jeremy, and we could use your help.

    If you, or your friends or colleagues, could fit the bill for one of the below-listed jobs, please let us know by clicking through and applying. We’ve got more demand for professionals on TheLadders than ever before, and would love to get 2013 started off right for all of us!

    Jack Jack Kelly
    Managing Director and Executive Recruiter at Compliance Search Group

    VP Compliance / Mortgage Servicing Vendor Management, New York, NY
    Product Compliance Officer, VP, New York, NY
    VP, Advertising, Marketing Material Review Compliance, New York, NY
    Richard

    Richard Bryant
    President at Bryant Associates

    Medical Sales Rep, Chicago, IL
    Trade Marketing Manager, CHICAGO, IL
    Marketing Services Manager, CHICAGO, IL

    Jim Jim Porter
    Senior Recruiter at The Porter Group

    Sales Rep / 7396356, Baltimore, MD
    District Sales Manager/-7966424, Baltimore, MD
    Sales Rep / -9105951, Baltimore, MD
    Chris Chris Curanovic
    Head of Marketing and IT at Nigel Frank International

    Dynamics CRM Developer , Montclair, NJ
    Salesforce.com Technical Architect-East Coast-$115-$135K, New York, NY
    Project Manager-All locations-$115K-120K, New York, NY
    Morgan Morgan Macdonell
    Recruiter at iPRO Staffing

    BI / DW Tech Lead (NEED ASAP), Berwyn, PA
    Senior Data Analyst (URGENT NEED), CHICAGO, IL
    General Manager in Training, Cincinnati, OH
    Randy Randy Witt
    Market Manager at KForce

    Junior PHP Software Engineer, New York, NY
    Senior Java Developer, New York, NY
    Senior Java J2EE Engineer, New York, NY
    Shari Shari Munro
    Vice President at Techpros

    Sr. SQL Server Developer, NEWTON, MA
    Sr. Software Engineer, Team Lead, Newton, MA
    UI Developer, Boston, MA
    Amerigroup Amerigroup Feed
    Senior Recruiter at AMERIGROUP Corporation

    Coordinator Communications, Virginia Beach, VA
    AVP Medical Economics Job, Virginia Beach, VA
    Business Consultant RN, Quality Management, VA
    Next Step Systems Next Step Systems Recruiter
    President at Next Step Systems

    Lead Trade Support Engineer, Chicago, IL
    C++ / Java Software Developer / Trading, Chicago, IL
    Web Developer, Chicago, IL
    Darren Darren Frank
    Sr. Vice President at Recruitment Trends, Inc.

    Sr. Information Security Engineer, Melville, NY
    Solution Architect: Oracle Fusion Middleware SOA/BPEL, Melville, NY
    Software Solutions Account Executive: CAD / 3D CG, Melville, NY

    Good luck on getting your year started out right, and good luck on the hunt!

    I’m rooting for you,

    Marc Cenedella

    Marc Cenedella, Founder

  • Start a new life tomorrow, we’ll tweet it for you

    A happy last day of the year!

    These past few years, I’ve used Twitter to keep in touch with you throughout the week and throughout the year, and you can, as always, follow me here: @cenedella.

    But this year, if you’re ready to move, the best source for job search tips, tidbits, and little reminders to get your act together, is my colleague @JobSearchAmanda.

    Every day in your Twitter feed, you get little reminders to not goof:

    Or make it more likely you’ll get a return call:


    Calm the butterflies in your stomach:


    Make a difficult job transition easier:


    Stay smart and up-to-date:


    Or make the right choice:


    If you’re seriously thinking about switching jobs next year, you really ought to be following @JobSearchAmanda.

    She’s rooting for you!

  • Take the week off with Bing & Bowie

    A merry Christmas Eve to you.

    While I’ll encourage you to make the most of August, get the jump on the other guy in December, and use the summer slowdown to your advantage, there are times when even fervent job geeks like me will advise you to take a load off and skip the job hunt.

    This week is one of them.

    Whatever your denomination, this week is for family, festivities, philosophy and fresh thinking for a fresh new year.

    So I thought the most ecumenical of approaches would be to share this video of Bing Crosby and David Bowie singing a lovely, peaceful, percussive ditty together:

    Because nothing says “the holidays” like a traditionalist from the Greatest Generation and an androgynous glam rocker sharing a piano and a song at the most wonderful time of the year.

    Have a wonderful week, Readers!

    I’m taking the week off, but will be rooting for you again next week!

  • Do Women Avoid Salary Negotiations?

    “Do Women Avoid Salary Negotiations?” is the provocative question posed by a recent study. What’s your experience?

    Me? I’m a skeptic about much research published in the careers area, but I found this study very well-constructed and the conclusions well-supported by the evidence.

    The authors want to answer the questions: do men and women negotiate differently? What if the job is a sports-related job? What if you mention explicitly that salaries are negotiable?

    All very interesting and clever.

    Here’s what they found:
    1. Men are more likely to negotiate pay, BUT,
    2. When they explicitly mentioned the possibility that wages are negotiable, women are (slightly) more likely to negotiate.
    3. Men’s propensity to negotiate is less pronounced when negotiating is done impersonally (i.e., over the internet) versus face-to-face.
    4. Men preferred applying for jobs where the ‘rules of wage determination’ were ambiguous.

    All of this led to lively, interesting discussions here, here, and here. And as one wag on the internet commented, perhaps the right question should be “do men ask too much?”

    I was curious, so I reached out to the authors, economists Andreas Leibbrandt, Monash Univ. and John List, U. of Chicago, to get further insights.

    I asked them “Do you think men ask too much, or women ask too little?”:

    “Our study suggests that women ask too little in ambiguous environments. For example, we find that women not only negotiate less for a higher wage, they even offer to work for a lower wage than advertised – something men rarely do.”

    And I also asked what they’ve learned since publication:

    “It was amazing to see how much attention our study received! We are under the impression that many people are hesitant to support laws, such as female quotas, that radically intervene in the labor market. Hopefully, our study signals that we are only at the beginning to understand that the gender gap in the labor market may be reduced with other measures. We are always looking for companies that are interested in working with us on this topic.”

    It was awfully nice for Professors List and Leibbrandt to share their insights…

    Anecdotally, in my own experience working with job seekers, I’d say that I’ve encountered among both genders an equal percentage of people with expectations that are unrealistically high and low. Looking for a job is a tremendously anxiety-producing endeavor and it tends to cause us to alter our self-evaluations in ways so that we can protect our feelings from the brutalities of the process.

    I’d also observe that I’ve seen that men are more comfortable sharing their unrealistic expectations and self-evaluations with strangers and employers alike. Call it obliviousness, call it savvy… sometimes, you get what you ask for.

    And perhaps the outcome is that all those people who think they deserve a better deal, actually achieve a better deal in the end. So while this may be provident from their point of view, for you, the important thing is to focus on your success in your job search, and, especially, your negotiations.

    So rather than provide advice based on your gender, I can provide the following advice for anybody who feels uncomfortable asking for more:

    1. Of course, it’s uncomfortable. Negotiating over the price for “you” can feel like putting a price on you as a person. And that’s awkward.

    But you need to realize that wages are an economic price for your economic output. And your economic output has nothing at all to do with your value as a human being — we are all equal in the eyes of whatever Providence created us.

    2. The market price is the market price (and you deserve a little more). There is a market price for people like you — that is, there are a number of similar transactions where an employer has “purchased” the work output of another person. So it’s completely reasonable for that market price to be the beginning of where you start discussing this economic transaction.

    Further, you may be aware that you’re a very special person. And I, for one, think you deserve a little bit more than the average, ${firstname}. Whether it’s because of your experience, or background, or learning, or success, you deserve a little bit more than the middle of the pack.

    3. It’s unfair for you to withhold. Ultimately, you’re going to decide to take or keep this job based on a host of factors, but a large part will be because of the price your new employer is willing to pay. As it will make a significant difference in your decisions, now and in the future, it really is only fair, and almost your duty, to share with your future employer your pay requirements. Otherwise, you’re not allowing them to understand the whole picture about what they’ll need to do to get you, and keep you.

    In fact, you are doing them a favor by giving them accurate information. Anything less is just a bit impolite.

    4. Give them a reason. In negotiations in general, it’s always best if you give a reason (for far more on this, see Robert Cialdini’s excellent, timeless “Influence”). That reason could be anything: because I’ll need to have my spouse stay at home if I take this job, or, alternatively, because I’ll need to hire childcare. Because I’ll be travelling more, or, alternatively, because I’ll be travelling less. Whatever it is, it just has to be true.

    My favorite reason in this regard is “because I’d been expecting to earn more at my next position / promotion”. Believe me, even something as simple as your own expectations is sufficient.

    6. You’ve got my permission. The study mentions that women were less likely to negotiate in cases where it’s not explicitly mentioned that the pay is negotiable.

    So, whatever your gender, let me say this: I give you permission to always negotiate salary and compensation. Pay is always negotiable. The negotiation may not end with a change, although, frankly, that’s fairly rare in my experience, but pay is always and everywhere negotiable by everybody. And that means you. You have my permission, my blessing, and my fingers crossed on your behalf.

    So I am looking forward to the discussion in the comments on my blog post: “Do Women Avoid Salary Negotiations?” Trolls will be banished with dispatch!

    And I will wish great success to you during these holidays and the New Year!

    I’m always rooting for you!

    Marc Cenedella, Founder


    TheLadders Twitter
     You should follow me on Twitter here: @cenedella

    P.S. Speaking of research, my colleague Archana Agrawal has just published her first research from our studies into making your job search more effective. Please check out, “Navigating the Black Hole” published in Personnel Psychology.

  • Seats, sips, “powder”, and pow-wows

    So I’m going to continue my theme from last week and cover more ground about how you should go about interviewing your future boss & company.

    There’s nothing that makes us sadder here at TheLadders than an (unnecessary) repeat customer — the folks who discover that their dream job is a bad dream, the kind you need to wake up from right away — so we want you to make sure it’s a good match before accepting.

    Last week I shared with you the twenty questions to ask your interviewers to learn more about the job and the opportunity.

    Well, there’s more to understanding an opportunity than what people say, of course.

    You also need to do a “Visual Interview” of your prospective employer’s office environment. Now, this little bit of recon doesn’t mean you should connect with your inner James Bond and pull a snoop worthy of Skyfall. But it does mean that you should observe and assess the office layout, kitchens, bathrooms and meeting rooms. Or, as I like to call them:

    Seats, sips, “powder”, and pow-wows.

    The reason this is important is that your physical environment has a great impact on your productivity and happiness. And how much your future employer values, or devalues, these areas, is oftentimes a good predictor of how they feel about their employees in general, and thereby, you.

    Seats

    What is the office layout? How are desks arranged? How much space, light, and quiet is each employee given?

    Importantly: how does that work with your style?

    I’m flummoxed at the number of times people overlook this.

    For instance, here at TheLadders, we’re an open floor plan — everybody, CEO to college intern, has the same cheap desk from IKEA, an Aeron chair, two, three, or more, monitors, and sits out in the open. We like it that way and it promotes the open, collaborative environment that we think is important for our success.

    We had one senior person, who’d come to our office multiple times for multiple interviews, show up on the first day asking “Where’s my office?” And it turned out that open seating was deeply dissatisfying to him and helped shorten his tenure here.

    Take notice: how comfortable you are with the seating arrangements, and the environment around your workspace, is important to your future success.

    Sips

    When they ask if you’d like a coffee or water, say “sure, but I don’t want to make you carry it — I’ll come with you.” And check out the kitchen / pantry / snack room / break room.

    Is it messy? Teeny-tiny? Are they scrimping on the Sweet ‘N’ Low and stingy with the stirrers?

    Or is it a Google-esque cornucopia of Cheetos, siggi’s, and starfruit?

    Napoleon quipped that “an army marches on its stomach.” Does your future employer agree?

    “Powder”

    I’ve been watching too much 40′s and 50′s period drama on TV recently. (Got into “Foyle’s War” from the UK on my Netflix — brilliant!) So I’ll use that old euphemism “powder room” for the john.

    One investor claims that a trip to the bathroom is the best way to figure out how a company feels about its employees.

    Investments in fixing the “powder room” are always discretionary. So how discretionary is employee happiness, when nature calls, in the mind of your prospective employer?

    Is it dingy, dim-lit, dungeon-like and depressing? Have the walls been painted since… the 50s?

    Or is it clean, well-stocked and well-maintained?

    Where does this employee priority fit into management’s priorities?

    Pow-wows

    You’ll likely walk past a number of conference and meeting rooms during your visit to a company’s offices. What do those rooms tell you about working at the company?

    Are there schedules on the doors? Are those schedules completely filled back-to-back? Or is most work done by individuals at their desks?

    Are the conference rooms packed? Are more people in them or out of them?

    Do the meeting rooms seem to be places to get work done? Are they filled with whiteboards and creativity?

    Or is there one lonely lightbulb swaying in the emptiness?

    How much and how well you’ll be expected to work with others is important for you to know.

    ——

    All of these cues and clues can help give you a fuller picture of life at the new company.

    You can read too much into them, and no one place is a nirvana constructed solely for your advantage. But it does behoove you to ensure that your new environment is acceptable to you and will enable you to perform your best.

    So on your interviews, in addition to asking, make sure you take some time for looking and doing the visual interview.

    I’ll be rooting for you!